WinGet 1.4 launches with zip extraction support and more

Windows Package Manager in the Microsoft Store

Microsoft has announced the availability of WinGet 1.4. Notable in this update is the zip support that can automatically extract installation packages from zipped folders and install them. The installer packages that are supported are MSIX, MSI, and EXE. This release also includes new command aliases for people more familiar with other command line tools.

This is what’s new in Windows Package Manager (WinGet) 1.4:

WinGet Show Improvements

A few more manifest values like tags and purchase URL were added to the output (if they are present) of winget show . Below I have an example running winget show oh-my-posh -s winget. Since Oh My Posh is available both in the Microsoft Store and the Windows Package Manager community repository, I narrowed the results down to the “winget” source. If you like the colorful display in my prompt, that’s the prompt theme engine I’m using.

Screenshot of WinGet Show Improvements

Command Aliases

Muscle memory can be hard to overcome. If you’ve ever tried to type “dir” on a Linux system or “ls” on Windows, you know what I mean. Several new command aliases have been added to WinGet that might help a little. When you run winget with no arguments, the default help displays the available commands. If you drill in a bit running winget –help you will see if any aliases are available. Below, you can see “find” is an alias for “search”. Other command aliases include add for install, update for upgrade, remove and rm for uninstall, ls for list, and config for settings.

Screenshot showing command aliases

As you might expect, you can now run winget find vscode and the same output is displayed as if you had run winget search vscode.

Screenshot of WinGet Find alias

Note: The results displayed when searching the Windows Package Manager Community repository are ordered by a “best match” heuristic. WinGet evaluates the

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Surface and Windows revenue tanks 39% in latest Microsoft earnings report

What you need to know

  • Microsoft released its FY23 Q2 earnings report today.
  • The company brought in $52.7 billion in revenue (up 2%).
  • The More Personal Computing division got hit harder than expected due to the declining PC market.
  • Surface (Devices) and Windows OEM revenue were both down 39%, with Devices worse than last quarter’s guidance.

The PC market is dropping off a cliff, and Microsoft feels the hurt. While the company is up just 2% in overall revenue at $52.7 billion for FY23 Q2 (opens in new tab) (just below some street expectations), the More Personal Computing division has been hit particularly hard.

More Personal Computing, which includes Surface, Windows, Xbox, and Bing, earned $14.2 billion, down 19% year-over-year. Microsoft had given investors guidance of $14.5 to $14.9 billion US dollars meaning Microsoft is in a bit more trouble in these areas than anticipated.

Windows OEM licensing revenue declined by 39%. While that is not great, Microsoft’s guidance did say Windows OEM expects income to fall “in the high 30s”, which is in line with what was delivered. Of course, such a significant decline is never welcomed, but Microsoft wasn’t caught off guard by the number and is within expectations.

(Image credit: Microsoft)

Surface (Devices), however, was hit a bit harder. It, too, declined by 39% (it was up 2% last quarter), although Microsoft had estimated “approximately 30 percent” for the quarter, making that a big miss. The number suggests that Microsoft’s latest offerings of Surface Laptop 5, Surface Pro 9, and Surface Studio 2+ failed to convince consumers to fork over some money. And with no Surface Duo 3 in the portfolio to launch, there was undoubtedly less excitement.

Xbox and gaming also took a big hit, with a 13% decline year-over-year in revenue. 

Search (Bing) and news

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The Windows 11 File Explorer is getting a big redesign… again

The upcoming File Explorer update will show recommended items, activity history, and more directly in Windows 11’s interface.


Microsoft is working on a big update for the File Explorer in Windows 11, bringing with it a modernized design and additional features. This is on third round of significant changes bein made to File Explorer, after the initial Windows 11 release, and then the addition of tabs in the first “moment” update for Windows 11 version 22H2.


The information comes from Zac Bowden of Windows Central, and the report comes with a look at some of the upcoming changes. One of the first things you’ll notice is the new Recommended section in the Home screen, which ties into broader plan to integrate Microsoft 365 more deeply into the experience. Recommended files are pulled from SharePoint and OneDrive locations, and they’re shown with large thumbnails so you have a clearer view of the files that are being recommended.

Screenshot of a redesigned Windows 11 File Explorer with a Recommended section showing files with large thumbnails.

Image credit: Future

This integration goes deeper, too, as the Details pane for a file is also being modernized to show even more information. You’ll be able to see recent activity on shared files, as well as recent comments on a file, whether that file is shared through the cloud or via email. One of the images shared also shows a section for related files, which give you more context for a specific case you may be working on.

Screenshot of the Details pane in Windows 11 showing recent activity on a shared file

Image credit: Future

Another change, although we don’t have a look at this one yet, is a new Gallery view that’s being added to File Explorer to make it easier to browse and view pictures. According to the report, you’ll be able to hover over a photo to see a larger preview of it. Microsoft is also apparently considering adding tags to files, similar

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Microsoft Q2 2023: Windows, devices, and Xbox down as cloud holds strong

Microsoft has just posted the second quarter of its 2023 fiscal financial results. The software maker made $52.7 billion in revenue and a net income of $16.4 billion during Q2. Revenue is up 2 percent, but net income has dropped by 12 percent. The results come just days after Microsoft announced 10,000 layoffs.

Microsoft previously forecast a tough quarter for Windows OEM revenue and hardware, and the results are clear on the state of the PC industry right now. PC shipments fell by 16 percent in 2022, according to analysis by Canalys, and Gartner reported a nearly 29 percent year-over-year drop in Q4 — the largest quarterly shipment decline since it began tracking the PC market in the mid-1990s. Microsoft’s Windows-related revenue has been hit hard as a result.

Windows OEM revenue, the price PC manufacturers pay Microsoft to put Windows on machines, fell by a massive 39 percent in Q2. Microsoft says this was driven by “continued PC market weakness and a strong prior year comparable.”

The Surface Pro 9 in laptop mode.

Surface Pro 9.
Photo by Amelia Holowaty Krales / The Verge

Gartner says the total amount of PC shipments in 2022 was close to pre-pandemic levels, so it’s clear the boom of laptop purchases is well and truly over. “Since many consumers already have relatively new PCs that were purchased during the pandemic, a lack of affordability is superseding any motivation to buy, causing consumer PC demand to drop to its lowest level in years,” says Mikako Kitagawa, director analyst at Gartner.

“While the number of PCs shipped declined during the quarter, returning to pre-pandemic levels, usage intensity of Windows continues to be higher than pre-pandemic, with time spent per PC up nearly 10 percent,” says Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella in an earnings call today.

This deterioration in the PC market has

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Exclusive: This is Microsoft’s new modern File Explorer overhaul for Windows 11

As was revealed a handful of weeks ago, Microsoft is currently working on a significant update to File Explorer on Windows 11 that will update several core areas of the app with modern designs and new features that will better integrate the experience with OneDrive and Microsoft 365.

Internal mock-ups obtained by Windows Central reveal that the updated app will feature a redesigned header with a modern file directory box, a modern search box, and a new “home” button. The existing header buttons, such as “new,” “copy,” and “paste,” will be moved into the file/folder view just below the header.

The home page itself is being updated with more integration with Microsoft 365. Along the top will be a feed of “recommended” files, which will be presented with larger thumbnails that will make it easier to see what files are being suggested to you. 

(Image credit: Windows Central)

Even the left-side navigation is being updated with more modern code, rounded highlight buttons, and more. The details pane is also getting a significant update to align with the rest of File Explorer, including integration with Microsoft 365 and a richer experience for seeing file details.

The deeper integration with Microsoft 365 means users can see email threads and recent comments about files shared via the cloud across multiple colleagues or attached via email. This info will be visible at a glance on files that are being shared or via the details pane.

I’m told that many of the updates to these areas of File Explorer will also aid in making it more friendly for touch users.

(Image credit: Future)

Additionally, Microsoft is working on a more rich photo viewing experience for File Explorer via a new “Gallery” area. Users should be able to mouse over to view larger previews of photos.

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